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20130201
20130228
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CSPAN2 17
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Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
's not going to work out. another woman who wrote to me, diane, says my rent for my family home -- [shouting] >> i don't -- i don't know why they're groaning, mr. speaker. there are thousands of their constituents will be hit by this. another woman who wrote to me, diane, says adequate, my rent for my family home is up present 65 pounds 68. we are the one bedroom and the private sector would cost over 100 pounds. thank you how can it possibly make sense to force people into a situation where it costs the state more not less by moving to the private rented sector? >> what this government is doing is building more homes. if he supports that, will he now support our changes to the planning system? will he support the new homes bonus? will he support the things that will get more homes build and get more people into jobs? because of course with 1 million extra people working in the private sector. that is what he is got to engaging. he's got absolutely no suggestion for how to get on top of welfare, get our deficit down, get our economy moving, or frankly do anything else. >> ed miliband. >> so
so i have two stories about the freedom ride starring diane - by and large who is probably the most overlooked central figure in that period. so it cannot the stories cannot be 18 and when i did it i felt i could boil down the adjusted debt to give people a sense of it. you can't do it let's see if you can do it under 300. i'm very proud of this. i did it in under 200. [laughter] people say we are so out this ought to make us feel good about what we can do we don't talk more about race i forgot what you said at the beginning to read the problem of the 21st century is still the color line, too. it didn't go away. the world was still colonized it was colonized during that time and was literally by the european nations we don't want to have an empire but we are going into a superpower. in that sense it did make for the colonization and the race and segregation in the united states and the legacy of slavery, a global problem we are still dealing with a lot of truth in the person still paying and the dislocation today for anyplace in the world the british or french diplomat drew a line o
rides, diane nash is the most overlooked central figure in that period so it came out that the stories turned out to be 18 and when i did i felt i could boil down the gist of it to give people a sense of it. you cannot do 800 or 400, let's see if you can do this at 305 very proud of this, i did it in under 200. [applause] >> i wanted to go the extra mile on the chance that what i am hoping is to have people say all! we are so out of phase, a few good about what we do, why is it that we don't and our politics is paralyzed and we don't talk more about race? i forgot what you said at the beginning. the problem with the 20 first century is the color line too. didn't go away just like my three books didn't go away. but i don't think it is as social. when he spoke, remember, the world was still colonized. most of the world was colonized at that time and literally owned by european nations and our only claim to fame was we said we didn't want an empire but we were growing into a super power and in some instances we got a pass. in that sense it really did make race through colonization a globa
as concerned about it as you are. >> host: this e-mail -- this is from diane in brooklyn, mr. robinson, we have about ten minutes left in the program. excuse me, mr. robinson, you seem like a brilliant, thoughtful, committed and well-intentioned man. i've heard many things listening to you that i did not know and wish had been more publicized. i am shik to your cause -- sympathetic to your cause, but i have a problem. my question is this: how can you expect to ever produce a generation of black youth psychologically capable of overcoming the terrible wound inflicted upon your people when you keep picking off the scab, when you keep passing on to your children the victim mentality to which i am sad to see you still maintain allegiance? >> guest: well, i don't know what to say. i don't think i can satisfactorily answer that question for that person. um, and i don't try to answer that question, frankly. i think those who have endured and those who have been wounded and those who were in trouble know what i'm saying. and they understand it. um, so i won't even try to answer that question. >> host:
workforce partnership program. diane joined the program because she was unemployed after having been laid off and was looking for a new career. diane has already been hired by a corporation in new holstein as a c and c operator. she started work literally yesterday. diane is with us here tonight. [applause] diane, congratulations to you and your fellow classmates. we worked with the university of wisconsin system in a new flexible degree program called uw flex option. [applause] to help adult learners earn degrees in targeted fields. nearly a quarter of all adults in the state have some college credit without a degree. for many time and money are the barriers to finishing that degree. i can relate. during my senior year at market university i was offered a full-time job at the american red cross. i would thought i squeeze in a course here and there and finish things off in a year or two. then tonette and i got married and we had mat, then came alice. next you're putting time and extra money into your kids. the uw flex option will provide a less time-consuming less costly way to help peopl
because the tea party has actually ruined the republican party. >> host: jim's in austin, texas. diane is an independent, she's in the vermont. hi, diane. go ahead. >> caller: hi. thanks for c-span, the only actual reality show on tv. thank you so much. i usually call on the republican line, but i'm not sure what i am anymore. i do know for a fact that i'm a member of the taxed enough already group, and that is what tea actually stands for. i'm not really sure what the original question was, i think it had something to do with how is the sequester going to hurt -- >> host: and we're asking how will it affect you? >> caller: i don't think it's going to affect me at all. i'm so low in the tax bracket now that i'm pairly surviving. our family has learned how to live quite well on very little money, and it it can be done, ad it can be done pretty happily for our small family. this is not a democracy, it is representative republic, and there is a lot of misinformation and disinformation that has been perpetuated over 40 years of the public school system, i believe. people are very, very mis
. diane, probably the most overlooked central figure in that period. so it came out, it came out that the stories turned out to be 18. and when i did i felt i could boil down the gist of it to give people a sense of it in the number. i really had more of a sense of pages. you cannot do this 800 to come you can't do it 400, let's see if you can do it under 300. and i'm very proud of this, i dated under 200. [laughter] [applause] >> and i wanted to go the extra mile on the chance that what i'm hoping is to have people say wow, we are so out of -- what is this that we don't and our politics is paralyzed and that we don't talk more about race. i forgot what you said at the beginning. >> dubois. >> dubois. the problem with the 21st century, it didn't go away, just like my three books didn't go away. but i don't think it's as essential. when he spoke, remember, the world was still colonized. most of the world was colonized at that time, and were utterly owned by the european nations. and our only claim to fame was that we said we did much of an empire but we are growing into a superpow
spoke about the bill, including andy diane abbott.t, n >> last night, mr. speaker, last night's vote on same-sex s marriage is widely regarded as a historic vote. ines the prime minister agreee m with me that it situated to all of the people throughout the decades and all parties and indo no party, behind the scenes andr in public who have worked for such a quality? and does the prime minister agree with m e thteat the vote proves that the arc of history g slowly but it bends towards justice? >> i agree very much with the honorable lady. i think the last night's vote will be seen not just as making sure there is a proper element of equality but also helping us to build a stronger and fair society. i thought many of the speeches made last night were very moving, very emotional and i would pay tribute to all those people who actually made this case, some of them for many, many years, saying that they want their love to count the same way that a man and woman's love for each other counts. that is whwhwhwhwhwhwhwhwh a portion of today's british prime minister's question time from london.
the head table. i would ask each of you to stand up briefly. >> we have maria,, diane, chief operating officer and bob and donald gaucher, a reporter for usa today. we have andrea stone, freelance writer and a member who organized today's event. thank you for that. we have linda kramer jennings and she is a clamor magazine washington bureau chief, and jonathan smith, a reporter for the news and a former national press club president. [applause] >> our speaker today is chris dodd. he is head of the national picture association of america. as chairman and ceo of the nmpaa, he made his debut last year at last year's oscar wirtz breaky remains the best-known here as the god of the dodd-frank consumer protection act from the most sweeping legislative reform since the 1930s. he is most proud of his records on children and family issues. he was the author of the 1993 family and medical leave of he would later moved his wife, jackie, and their two young daughters a few months before the first of the nation caucuses. but then senator barack obama camp 10 minutes colleagues in the caucuses. [lau
stories about the freedom ride starring diane nash, by and large, probably thee most overlooked central figure in that period. it came out -- it came out that the stories turned out to be 18, and when i did it, i felt i could boil down the gist of it to give people a sense of it in the number of -- i really had more of a sense of pages. you cannot do this 800 -- you can't do it 400, let's see if you can do it in, you know, under 3 # 00, and i -- i'm very proud of this, i did it in under 200. [laughter] [applause] i wanted to go the extra mile on the chance that what i'm hoping is to have people say, wow, we are so out of phase, this ought to make us feel good about what we can do. why is this that we don't, and that our politics is paralyzed and that we don't talk more about race? that's how it -- i forgot what you said at the beginning. [laughter] >> debois. >> debois, the prob of the century is the color line. it didn't go away, just like my three books didn't go away, but i don't think it's as central. when he spoke, remember, the world was still colonized. most of the world was colo
altman and diane roland and their colleagues and the folks op our panel for their active involvement in all of this work. one last plea for you to listen to this gentleman's question. [laughter] >> yes, i've heard recently that among developed nations the u.s. has fallen to the bottom as far as longevity is concerned. yet we're paying a lot more than other people. wouldn't it save substantial medicare costs if we veered away from the pill for every ill, that mindset that we've kind of adopted in this country and embrace, look at other measures such as prevention, alternatives and educating people on things like genetically-modified foods and the long-term dangers they can present? >> i don't know who wants to take this. this is, i mean, questions often come up about improving coverage of prevention sort of over the course of a lifetime and in medicare. um, and there's been a lot of in that, and there have been a lot of improvements lately. one of the sort of unfortunate realities of living in this town and working with the congressional budge office as a score -- budget office as a s
was at least partly -- dian rinehart, congressional research. user the nuclear test was at least partly designed to sort of break this possibility of inter-korean under madam president park. but it seems to me that it's more of sort of a drawback if anything. and i'm curious to see if you don't how you would explain that, why you would want to sort of throw a wrench in the possible trust policy that she's talked about. you know, what does north korea gain by basically foreclosing any possibility of engagement for the near-term? >> well, if we understood why north korea makes provocations, we would be better off understanding why they would take these actions, antithetical to their interests. the reality i think is that park geun-hye at all ready been using friends to reach out to the north korean government, and to let them know publicly as well that a summit meeting would be asked for in 2013, sometime this year, and clearly she campaigned on the idea of a more balanced approach to north korea. that is, as well as having to do with the security threats. but something more measured than
with george and robin roberts and diane sawyer, and the president of abc news. they are wonderful people. hi a great time there. i was personally ready for a new challenge. i had been a correspondent for ten years and anchoring seemed like a pretty cool thing, and i'll have my own show on cnn, and we'll see if i'm any good at it. thanks. [applause] >> how are you, sir. lieutenant tom, going to afghanistan next week. just a quick question. i know it motivated you to get into the correspondence, writing "the outpost," but i guess i really appreciate what you do for us. i wonder your opinion how to get more correspondence with us to tell our stories. >> first of all, thank you for your service -- [applause] is that your wife next to you? thank you to you too. i know when i was embedded for a week in afghanistan, was probably the worst week of my wife's life, and i didn't have a gun with me, and i was not running after anything dangerous. this is a larger -- the question about what -- how could we get more reporters telling the stories? first of all, there's a lot of great reporters trying to do
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)